Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Jim Brooks


My friend Jim Brooks died at home January 9, 2018.


Jim Brooks (AKA William James Brooks)
I met Jim during July of 1985.  I was thinking of getting into bicycling and Jim was already in it, having been riding to work for a couple years.  I had ridden about 30 miles in one sitting prior to our meeting but he told me was riding 100 miles at time.  He encouraged me to get into it.  At the time he told me about a ride called Tour of the Scioto River Valley, TSRV.  It occurred on Mother's Day each year.  I rode it the following May, Mother's Day.

We got together to "train" for it.  I would go to Mt. Vernon and he would take me for a ride, then  he would come to Mansfield and I would take him out to ride.

Jim Brooks
Jim was so into bicycling that he had a vanity plate PDLPWR.

Jim liked other things like canoeing.  They have the Kokosing River in Mt. Vernon.  Jim used to take me in his canoe for rides.

Jim Brooks with his canoe
Kokosing River
I sincerely enjoyed the ride and attending sights.

Great Blue Heron
River View of Barns

Jim with the National Champion Sycamore
I found this tree difficult to photograph.  It was so big that when I got back to get it in the picture it got lost in the background.  I invited Jim to go see it with me and his presence was the answer to my compositional quandary.  

Jim with the National Champion Sycamore
Jim on his ICE Trike
Jim's balance became questionable in later years so he got an ICE Trike and liked it a lot.  The above picture was captured on the Kenyon College Campus in Gambier, just up the Kokosing Gap Trail from Jim's house.  We went there multiple times for lunch.

Jim with College Students

This has gone on too long.  I could mention Great Ohio Bicyling Adventure, Columbus Fall Challenge, girlfriends before Carol, We were friends for 32 years.

I'm sure he had disappointments with our relationship and so did I.  Overall, Jim, it was a great ride.  Thanks for it all.

Sunday, January 21, 2018

Metric Scale



Metric Scale
I had a scale from my days in the machine shop which was imperial.  The folks at mindat.org didn't like to make the conversion.  I decided that I might as well purchase a metric scale since camera and lens sizes are metric.  It would simplify everything.  I purchased one that was graduated in 1/2 mm increments.  

In order to provide the viewer field size and magnification on the sensor data I found that I must photograph the scale each time I made a capture.  OR, I could set my macro/micro lens to its shortest focus, adjust the focus with the focusing rail.  I record FOV captures for each setup and record it so that if I start with certain setup I know what the FOV and magnification as long as I start with Sigma 105mm set at its closest focus.  I've also found that recording the WD, working distance, aids my set up, composition, etc., making it quicker and easier.  Again, I do this with the micro lens set on closest setting.  I am planning to share the above data soon.

One other "trick" I have learned I may have mentioned before.  I can shine my flashlight into the viewfinder and it travels backward through the camera showing where it is aimed.


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Friday, January 19, 2018

Pyrochlore





Pyrochlore
Wikipedia says that these crystals occur as Octahedra.  As you can see this sample does not conform.  It comes to us from Myeba, Kenya, Africa.

Being smaller than I remembered it is about 1/8" across.  I am still trying to wrap my mind around this being a crystal.  I find myself thinking a crystal is at least opac to at most clear or prismatic.

Pyrochlore
Wikipedia says that it has a "diverse technological applications like in luminescence, ionic conductivity, nuclear waste immobilization, high temperature thermal barrier coatings, automobile exhaust gas control, catalysts, solid oxide fuel cell, ionic/electric conductors...


Pyrochlore
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Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Eulalia Grass



Eulalia Grass
We have very little of this domestic grass which has escaped to Gorman.  I was aware of two or three clumps of it at the time of capture of the above (Dec. 2012).  I have long been an admirer of ornamental grasses and this is one of them.

Like many of the perennial plants at Gorman, it grows from seed but mostly comes back each year from its underground rhizomes.  It a plant originally from Eastern Asia, China, Japan, etc.


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Monday, January 15, 2018

Vertical Shot Setup



Vertical Shot Setup
 Occasional, I have need for what I call "Vertical Shot Setup" for compositional reasons.  I think of the tiny minerals I shoot as landscapes.  The landscapes are difficult to set up because of the lack of much DOF, depth-of-field.  Sometimes, I must shot several to get "the lay of the Land."

To make this device I used my usual setup with the addition of parts from my King Panoramic device.  I have not used it since I improved my pedestal with a rotating subject plane.  I have not thought this through yet but I may not need the vertical shot setup.  I'll think about it when the need arises.

Please note the Adorama Focusing rail, above, is also part of the setup.  I consider it essential micro photography.




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Saturday, January 13, 2018

Clinoptilolite




Clinoptilolite
Clinoptilolite was described in 1969 from Owl Canyon, San Bernardino, California.  That is a relatively late date for a mineral to be first decribed.

The sample above comes from Augoura, Los Angeles Co., California.  It is used in fertilizer and deodorant.

Clinoptilolite
It has an ion exchange affinity making it favored my scientists.  It especially exchanges easily with Ammonium. 


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Thursday, January 11, 2018

Cherry Fuchsia

Cherry Fuchsia
This comes from our home in July, 2004.  It was a plant we brought in for the summer.

Most Fuchsias are native to South America.  North through Central America and Southern US their numbers diminish.  I think this bloom also embodies the color whose name is the same as the plant.


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